Category: Voices of Detroit (page 1 of 22)

Reflection on Love and Struggle

Reflection on Love and Struggle

Robin D.G. Kelley in conversation with Fred Moten

Transcription and commentary by Mike Doan

*
How do we build a new future? How central to this work are love and power?

“Love is the answer.” “All you need is love.” “Love trumps hate.” Hopelessly naïve?

        – Love (noun): A sentimental feeling. An intimate, personal, private state of mind. The dullest of the weapons of the weak.

Or, can love become “a material force for change,” as Jimmy used to say?

“Power is the enemy.” “Change the world without taking power.” “Power corrupts, absolutely.” Hopelessly naïve?

       – Power (noun): A repressive, abusive force. The essence of domination and oppression. What they’ve got over us, or we’ve got over them—and we’d rather do without.

Or, is there also power with, the power we build and share together, as Grace used to say?

What, after all, is power? And what’s love got to do with it?

Continue reading

In Love and Struggle: A Conversation with Stephen Ward and Robin D.G. Kelley

Thinking for Ourselves: Silence is not an Option

By Shea Howell

April 3, 2017

The Reverend Dr. William Barber II marked the beginning of activities reflecting on the 50th anniversary of Martin Luther King’s call for a radical revolution in values in “Beyond Vietnam: A Time to Break the Silence.” On Sunday morning, April 2, Dr. Barber spoke at Riverside Church in New York City from the same pulpit where Dr. King stood to speak to Clergy and Laity Concerned.

Dr. Barber is no stranger to struggle. Pastor of the Greenleaf Christian Church, Disciples of Christ in Goldsboro, North Carolina he has become a leading voice in the Forward Together Moral Movement that carried out weekly protests against the repressive in actions of the North Carolina Assembly. Just last month he was in Flint helping to bring attention to the lack of progress by state officials in addressing the water crisis there.

Drawing on Dr. King’s theme that there comes a time when silence is a betrayal to all we value and love, Dr. Barber pressed that today “Silence is no longer an option.” “We must challenge what is going on now,” he said, with the understanding that while the situation is “dire,” it is “not new.” Rather, “Trumpism is as America as apple pie,” and “every stride toward freedom is met with the same backlash.” This is the “call and response of American history” where every “season of racial progress” has been met with a “response of the progress of racism.” If we understand this history we should know that “we cannot afford the luxury of pretending Trump is an historical aberration.” He is “merely a symptom.”

Continue reading

Frank X. Murphy: A Modest Proposal

A Modest Proposal: 

Aggressive Interrogation of Corporate Education “Reformers” 101

By Frank X Murphy

April 2, 2017

Quaint, archaic notions of education from earlier eras have de-emphasized things like dialog, free inquiry and enlightenment values.  These pedagogical modes no longer apply to our modern, post-citizenship educational systems.  We propose new and more effective methods of interaction with those who measure educational “outcomes” using badly designed standardized tests and market-based rhetoric for power and profit.

Altho in earlier eras best practice responses to such crimes would often entail putting rats like the corporate education “reformer” against a wall and shooting them, these interrogation guidelines envision more effective civil resistance measures that allow learners to explore the contested boundaries between nonviolence, mental health, and the interaction of public policy with curriculum development in both community and school, for purposes of nonviolent (if possible) social self-defense.

The corporate education “reformer” should not be slammed against a wall (“walling”) without extreme provocation, and in no event for longer than the hours their racist and demeaning standardized tests are annually inflicted on children victimized by their abuse.

The corporate education “reformer” should be confined with smaller vermin, for a period minimally necessary under Detroit Public School-type room temperatures of excessive heat and unbearable cold, to give some appreciation for the unbearable human rights violations experienced by many Detroit school children in poorly designed and maintained buildings created by state takeover and “reform” scams.

Continue reading

Thinking for Ourselves: World Water Day

By Shea Howell

March 27, 2017

World Water Day passed without a word from Detroit Mayor Mike Duggan. Soon it will be three years since he got control of the Water Department and he has done almost nothing with this power. His direction has failed Detroiters and he is failing the future. His lack of leadership is stunning.

In July of 2014 when he was given control of the Water Department, Mayor Duggan said he welcomed “the responsibility for dealing with the Water Department issues.” He promised a plan to deal with the shut offs, to provide support for people unable to pay their bills and to improve services. None of this has happened.  He has utterly failed to advocate for water as a human right and failed to address concerns for water as a public trust.

Instead, water shutoffs continue with one failed payment support scheme after another. The Mayor stubbornly refuses to make the Water Affordability Plan passed over a decade ago by the City Council a reality. Instead, he continues policies that enrich a private corporation, giving it what seems to be a blank check to go around the city shutting people off. The Homrich Wrecking Company has expanded its original $5.6 million dollar contract for water shut offs to $12.7 million as of last fall. That is as much as the City of Flint paid Detroit for its entire water usage prior to its own man made crisis.

Continue reading

Thinking for Ourselves: Beyond Toxic Talk

By Shea Howell

March 20, 2017

How we talk is intimately connected to how we think. Words define our world and give meaning to our lives. Thus, one of the many dangers of this moment is the deterioration of our capacities for political thought. When public values are reduced to single words, blasted in all capital letters on Twitter, we are all diminished. BAD, SAD, FAKE, LIES are judgments devoid of substance, but they infiltrate our consciousness and erode our conversations.

In sharp contrast to this dismal use of language, people around the country are consciously moving to deepen our capacity for reflection, conversation, strategic thinking, and powerful action. There is a growing recognition that actions must be enriched by reflection, that the path to a better future requires collective efforts to create a new vision.

Continue reading

In Love and Struggle: A Conversation with Robin D.G. Kelley & Stephen Ward

We hope to see you all on April 2nd at 2pm!

In Love and Struggle: 

A Conversation with Robin D.G. Kelley & Stephen Ward

Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History

315 E. Warren Ave.

Detroit, MI

Book signing to follow conversation.

Looting Detroit: The Film Series

http://lootingdetroitthemovie.com/

In this film series, Detroiters tell the story of how a right-wing greed circus came to town. Evil clowns looted the city, using predatory housing loans, emergency management and bankruptcy. They now run Detroit.

Thinking for Ourselves: Fear to Hope

IMG_20170311_153224

By Shea Howell

March 13, 2017

Over 400 people gathered at the UAW-GM Center in Detroit to celebrate International Women’s Day. This was the 7th year of Women Creating Caring Communities, initiated by the UAW and Boggs Center. The theme was “The healing power of loving communities.” This was a gathering reflecting honesty, passion and resilience as we talked about our fears and hopes for this moment.

I was part of the opening conversation, emphasizing the question often asked by Grace Lee Boggs,  “What time is it on the clock of the world?’  I shared with the gathering my thinking about what Grace would most likely be saying to us, if she were there, as she had been for the first years of these sessions.

I think she would caution us to not become stuck on Trump. Rather she would be encouraging us to look to the forces behind him. The forces of violence and white supremacy have a long history in America. They are the forces that began the genocide against the indigenous peoples of this land at Plymouth Rock and they are the forces that are carrying it out today at Standing Rock.  They are the forces that stole people from their homes in Africa to enslave them and are now the forces stealing homes from African Americans through foreclosure, school closings, and water shut offs.

Continue reading

Thinking for Ourselves: Silence of the Good

BV Poster

By Shea Howell

March 6, 2017

Every year, on March 2, I listen to the speech Dr. Martin Luther King gave at my college in 1967. This year marks the 50th since I first heard him there. A month after he was in Marietta, Ohio, he would speak at Riverside Church in New York, “Breaking the Silence” on Vietnam. There he would proclaim that America was the “greatest purveyor of violence” in the world and that we needed a “radical revolution in values against racism, materialism, and militarism.” A year later, he would be killed.

King’s subject was the future of integration and, while acknowledging progress in civil rights, he explained that “the murder of civil rights workers is still a popular pastime in the south.”

Continue reading

Older posts